Stay Positive

"In the midst of winter I finally learned that there was in me an invincible summer." - Alert Camus

Saturday, October 20, 2018

Dpn't face your disease alone




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Friday, October 19, 2018

Moral heroism is not Trumpian behavior


The nature and roots of moral courage and heroic actions.


Moral heroism is not Trumpian behavior 




A hero ventures forth from the world of common day into a region of supernatural wonder: fabulous forces are there encountered and a decisive victory is won: the hero comes back from this mysterious adventure with the power to bestow boons on his fellow man.


Campbell, Joseph (1949). The Hero with a Thousand Faces
Princeton: Princeton University Press. p. 23.








Thursday, October 18, 2018

Fatigue is a common symptom of MS


Fatigue

https://www.dailydot.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/5.gif


Fatigue is a common symptom of MS


Friday, October 12, 2018

Can mindfulness help you manage chronic pain?




Can mindfulness help you manage chronic pain?

 


As a more holistic approach to pain management gains traction, the use of mindfulness and hypnosis has been shown to block out pain – some people have even been known to have surgery without anaesthetic ...

Pain management techniques include mindfulness-based stress reduction, which encourages sufferers to learn to be in the moment.
Pain management techniques include mindfulness-based stress reduction, which encourages sufferers to learn to be in the moment. Illustration: Thomas Pullin

“Pain is inevitable, suffering is optional” reads very much like something a Love Islander might caption a workout video on Instagram with – but the platitude is increasingly being backed up by science.

In recent years, the advent of functional brain imaging has brought with it a new understanding of the distinct biological and psychological components to pain. While pain is perceived in the brain when signals that something is wrong are transmitted through the central nervous system, suffering is increasingly defined as our interpretation of that pain signal. For instance, the biological root of pain could be a back injury, while suffering might arise as understandable emotional responses to that pain, including thoughts such as “this is unbearable” and “why me?” Because of this interplay, the International Association for the Study of Pain defines pain as being both a sensory and an emotional experience.

According to Dr Sarah Jarvis, GP and clinical director of Patient.info, for people suffering from chronic pain, there is a direct correlation between negative thought patterns and increased discomfort. “We know that there is a cause and an effect,” she says. “For instance, people who are depressed or stressed are more likely to feel pain more acutely. But being in chronic pain can itself cause psychological distress, which in turn worsens the pain.”

Of course, that’s not to say that people suffering from chronic pain are responsible for their own symptoms. “It’s impossible for pain or profound physical symptoms of any sort not to have an emotional impact,” says Jarvis. “But while we can’t always get rid of pain, there are ways to work on 
Techniques include mindfulness-based stress reduction, which encourages sufferers to learn to be in the moment. While you may assume that this would lead them to focus on their pain, the idea is to passively observe their emotional state. Progressive muscular relaxation, on the other hand, works on the premise that tensing and then releasing tension in specific muscle groups will lead to deep relaxation, inhibiting feelings of anxiety.

At the extreme end of the spectrum are people who manage to master their pain responses so successfully that they are able to undergo surgery without anaesthesia. Last year, in a world’s first, hypnosis was used instead of anaesthetic for deep brain surgery to cure an elderly patient’s trembling hands.

“At a basic level, it’s about people who have practised mindfulness to the extent that they can focus on one element of their being, and block out another,” says Jarvis. “We all know, for instance, that somebody who lives next to a busy road can sleep through a juggernaut, but wake up immediately if their baby whimpers. [Being operated on under hypnosis] is the same principle. Some people are exceptionally good at training the mind so that their entire focus is on the specific stimulus that they are focusing on, for instance their breathing, or a visualisation.”

While staying awake during surgery may be many people’s worst nightmare, a number of studies suggest that some patients feel less anxious doing so than at the perceived risk of being sedated and not waking up. Advocates of hypnosis argue that it has no side effects, makes operations quicker, is cheaper than general anaesthetic and (because it does not affect the workings of the body) allows patients to recover faster.

Jarvis cautions that there is a lack of high-quality studies into hypnotherapy, because it is difficult to conduct randomised placebo trials (where the patient doesn’t know whether they are under hypnosis or not). However, she does foresee a future where we rely on a more holistic approach to pain management. “It’s absolutely something that will increase,” she says. “There is increasing awareness that there is only so much we can do with drugs, and a much bigger focus on a multidisciplinary approach.”

Voltarol Back and Muscle Pain Relief 1.16% Gel contains an anti-inflammatory ingredient to help relieve pain and reduce inflammation at the source. Voltarol are experts in body pain, so whether it is joint or muscle pain, Voltarol can help you get back to doing the things you love. Movement can also help reduce your joint and back pain by 25% - did you know, the average person in the UK sits for nine hours a day? Find out more about how you can take two minutes out of your busy day to move with our Take 2 To Move campaign. Voltarol Back and Muscle Pain Relief 1.16% Gel contains diclofenac diethylammonium. For relief of pain and inflammation. Always read the label. Find out more at voltarol.co.uk.






Link: https://www.theguardian.com/freedom-to-move/2018/oct/04/can-mindfulness-help-you-manage-chronic-pain




Saturday, September 15, 2018

How Handwriting May Be a Clue Into Your MS-Related Cognitive Changes






Cognitive problems, like difficulties processing information, concentrating, organizing, remembering, and/or finding words when speaking, affect more than 50 percent of people with multiple sclerosis (MS). In fact, you may be surprised to learn that such cognitive deficits may be a person's first MS symptom.

Additionally, while a person's cognitive dysfunction is connected to the number of brain lesions they have on their MRI, it's not connected to their physical abilities. In other words, a person may be unable to walk and yet have no cognitive problems. On the flip side, a person may not be able to work due to thinking and memory problems, but have only minor (or no) physical disabilities.
Due to the elusive and complex nature of cognition dysfunction in MS, and the fact that people adopt compensatory techniques to overcome their personal deficits (which is great), it's often tricky determining if (or how much of) your cognition is affected by MS.

The good news is that besides undergoing a battery of tests with a neuropsychologist, research now suggests your handwriting may provide some insight into your cognition—a window into your brain power, so to speak.

Research on Handwriting and Cognition in MS

In a study in Scientific Reports, the handwriting of 19 people with progressive multiple sclerosis was compared to the handwriting of 22 healthy people of the same age. All of the participants wrote a specific sentence on a digitizing tablet. Then various handwriting parameters were compared between the two groups.

Results revealed there was a significant difference between the two groups when it came to sentence and word duration, as well as the spacing between word duration. In other words, it took people with MS longer to write each sentence.

In addition, handwriting stroke was analyzed and compared between the two groups. The participants with progressive MS had significantly higher stroke duration and stroke size, as well as a higher jerk. Jerk refers to the change in acceleration over time per stroke. What this basically means is that the writing of those with progressive MS compared to the healthy controls was less smooth.

Lastly, using statistics, the investigators sought to determine whether there were any links between these handwriting parameters and clinical features of MS, like movement abilities and cognitive function—and several were found.

Links Between MS Movement Abilities and Handwriting

Here are three links the investigators found, suggesting that impaired movement abilities in MS affect handwriting, especially the speed of writing.
Finger Dexterity
One test used to determine whether or not a link existed between motor abilities and handwriting in people with MS was the nine-hole peg test (NHPT). This test measures finger dexterity, which is the strength and flexibility of your fingers.
During the NHPT, a person is timed on how long it takes them to place nine pegs in nine small holes—so the longer it takes to place the pegs in the holes, the less dexterous their fingers are.
In this study, the investigators found that the longer it took for the participants with MS to complete the nine-hole peg test (NHPT), the longer it also took to write their sentence.
Grip Strength
The investigators found that in the participants with MS, the stronger their grip strength was, the faster they could write the sentence.
Weakness
There was a positive association found between perceived weakness and the time it took to finish one work and move to the next. In other words, the weaker a person feels, the longer the "break" time between writing words.

Link Between MS Cognitive Abilities and Handwriting

In terms of links to cognition, for the people with MS, the time it took to write the sentence increased with the decrease symbol digital modality test (SDMT) score.
The SDMT is a screening test used to sometimes measure cognitive impairments in MS. More specifically, this test evaluates information processing speed. Research suggests information processing speed is the most common cognitive deficit seen in MS, as well as the first one to emerge.
The fact that a link exists between SDMT score and sentence duration implies that handwriting is not simply an act of movement, but rather also tied to cognition.
The bottom line is that based on this study, a decline in cognition (as seen in MS) impacts handwriting skills.

More on MS-Related Cognitive Dysfunction and Handwriting

While we know handwriting problems are common in MS (prior research has revealed that people with MS are slower to write, and their writing overall is more irregular), the influence of a person's cognitive status on handwriting had not been previously explored. With this newfound link, it's possible that handwriting analysis could offer insight into a person's cognitive function.
This all said, it's important to remember that cognitive changes are commonly influenced by others issues like depression, anxiety, fatigue, stress, and medication. So teasing out and treating your cognitive deficits can be tricky, especially since some factors are reversible (for example, depression) whereas others are irreversible (for example, if your cognitive problems are from MS itself).
Finally, cognition is a broad term. With that, a person with MS may experience only one cognitive problem (like with processing information) while another person with MS may experience multiple cognitive problems (like with memory, information processing, and concentrating).
What this means is that a person may still have cognitive deficits and have "normal" handwriting. The reverse is true, too, as there are also other causes of deteriorating handwriting besides MS, like Parkinson's or certain psychiatric disorders like schizophrenia.

A Word From Verywell

If you are concerned about your cognitive abilities (or your loved one's), please speak with your neurologist.

Through cognitive rehabilitation, you can learn and practice techniques that can help you remember, plan, and think more easily. These techniques can also dramatically help improve your daily functioning and happiness.
View Article Sources
  • Bisio A, Pedulla L, Bonzano L, Tacchino A, Brichetto G, Bove M. The kinematics of handwriting movements as expression of cognitive and sensorimotor impairments in people with multiple sclerosis. Sci Rep. 2017 Dec 18;7(1):17730.
  • Dean DJ, Teulings H-L, Caligiuri M, Mittal VA. Handwriting analysis indicates spontaneous dyskinesias in neuroleptic naive adolescents at high risk for psychosis. J Vis Exp. 2013;(81):50852.
  • Gawda B. Dysfluent handwriting in schizophrenic outpatients. Percept Mot Skills. 2016 Apr;122(2):560-77.
  • National MS Society. (n.d.). Cognitive Changes.
  • Van Schependom J et al. Reduced information processing speed as primun movens for cognitive decline in MS. Mult Scler. 2015 Jan;21(1):83-91.  




 Link: https://www.verywellhealth.com/handwriting-and-cognitive-changes-in-multiple-sclerosis-4157572







Monday, September 10, 2018

Zakir Hussain & Rakesh Chaurasia / EtnoKraków / ROZSTAJE Crossroads Fest...



 


13:22 / 1:03:17

Zakir Hussain + Rakesh Chaurasia



ZAKIR HUSSAIN is undoubtedly one of the greatest legends of world music,
virtuoso of the tabla, and artist who tours and
records with many other acclaimed musicians, including those form the
world of jazz.
His father was the famous musician Ustad Alla Rakha. Thanks to his
father, Zakir learned to play musical instruments from his youngest
days. He started performing as a teenager, and when he was 19 years old,
he travelled to the US for the first time, appearing alongside Ravi
Shankar.
Audiences remember Hussain’s acclaimed albums, especially “Making Music”
recorded for the famous ECM label. It is regarded as one of the finest
musical fusions of the East and the West. Hussain was accompanied by
John McLaughlin, Jan Garbarek and the legendary Hariprasad Chaurasia –
uncle of Rakesh, who joins Hussain in Kraków.
Hussain has worked with McLaughlin many times, for example when creating
recordings with his groups Shakti and Remember Shakti. He also worked
alongside Bill Laswell, leading the group Tabla Beat Science bringing
together acclaimed tablists and percussionists. He has also co-created
the outstanding projects Planete Drum and Global Drum, and worked with
some of the greatest musicians of all time, from George Harrison and Van
Morrison to Pharoah Sanders and Charles Lloyd. He is a living legend
himself.
RAKESH CHAURASIA is more than just a nephew of Hariprasad Chaurasia – he
is also one of his most talented pupils. He plays the bansouri, a
traditional South Asian bamboo flute. He has worked with musicians
including Talvin Singh, participated in recording dozens of albums, and
he leads the RAF ensemble – Rakesh and Friends.
Recorded at ICE Kraków 08.07.2015.

Zakir Hussain - tabla, percussion instruments
Rakesh Chaurasia - bansouri

www.rozstaje.pl / www.etnokrakow.pl
www.facebook.com/rozstaje.crossroads.fes­tival.krakow
www.facebook.com/etnokrakow





Saturday, September 1, 2018

Weed stocks are surging


Weed stocks are surging after one of Canada’s largest cannabis companies doubled its quarterly sales 




(TLRY) -  http://markets.businessinsider.com/news/1027493899










Friday, August 31, 2018


Help Design a Mobility Scooter

Help Design a Mobility Scooter

I’ve been using a mobility scooter for about 10 years.
I use it anytime I need to walk more than about half a city block. I throw it in the back of my SUV, I’ve taken it on planes and cruise ships (I’ve ridden it in 15 or 16 countries), and I even use it to walk the dog.
I have two scooters. One is lightweight at 35 pounds and can be folded. The other is heavier, but it can be separated into four parts. It’s more comfortable than the first and is better on inclines. The lightweight one is twice as fast, and its battery lasts a lot longer. In other words, one size doesn’t always fit all. That’s the point of this column.

Building the perfect scooter

For the past four years, Emily and Tom Morgan have been trying to design an electric mobility scooter that will do it all. They have two relatives who have MS, and from what they’ve observed, there’s a need for a better scooter.
Tom is a mechanical engineer, and Emily is an information technology specialist. Combining their knowledge with that of friends, some of whom are professional industrial designers and prototypers, they’ve come up with a rough design. But they’d like some input from us — folks with MS who actually ride these things. So, they’ve put together an online survey. It takes about 10 minutes to complete — and I think it’s time well-spent.
If you’d like to help out by providing some input on the design of a new mobility scooter, you can go to the survey here.

Is a scooter right for you?

I’ve heard from a lot of people over the years who never thought they’d use a scooter until they tried one. I was one of them, but I’m sooo glad I bought one. If you’d like to read about some of my scooter experiences you can check out a few columns that I’ve written:
Even if you don’t read my other columns, I suggest you take a few minutes to let your voice be heard by taking the survey. I’m sure Emily and Tom will appreciate it.
You’re invited to follow my personal blog at www.themswire.com.
***
Note: Multiple Sclerosis News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Multiple Sclerosis News Today or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to multiple sclerosis.

Help Design a Mobility Scooter

Help Design a Mobility Scooter 
 
 
 

I’ve been using a mobility scooter for about 10 years.
I use it anytime I need to walk more than about half a city block. I throw it in the back of my SUV, I’ve taken it on planes and cruise ships (I’ve ridden it in 15 or 16 countries), and I even use it to walk the dog.
I have two scooters. One is lightweight at 35 pounds and can be folded. The other is heavier, but it can be separated into four parts. It’s more comfortable than the first and is better on inclines. The lightweight one is twice as fast, and its battery lasts a lot longer. In other words, one size doesn’t always fit all. That’s the point of this column.

Building the perfect scooter

For the past four years, Emily and Tom Morgan have been trying to design an electric mobility scooter that will do it all. They have two relatives who have MS, and from what they’ve observed, there’s a need for a better scooter.
Tom is a mechanical engineer, and Emily is an information technology specialist. Combining their knowledge with that of friends, some of whom are professional industrial designers and prototypers, they’ve come up with a rough design. But they’d like some input from us — folks with MS who actually ride these things. So, they’ve put together an online survey. It takes about 10 minutes to complete — and I think it’s time well-spent.
If you’d like to help out by providing some input on the design of a new mobility scooter, you can go to the survey here.

Is a scooter right for you?

I’ve heard from a lot of people over the years who never thought they’d use a scooter until they tried one. I was one of them, but I’m sooo glad I bought one. If you’d like to read about some of my scooter experiences you can check out a few columns that I’ve written:
Even if you don’t read my other columns, I suggest you take a few minutes to let your voice be heard by taking the survey. I’m sure Emily and Tom will appreciate it.
You’re invited to follow my personal blog at www.themswire.com.
***
Note: Multiple Sclerosis News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Multiple Sclerosis News Today or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to multiple sclerosis.




Link:

https://multiplesclerosisnewstoday.com/2018/08/28/ms-help-design-mobility-scooter/




Monday, August 6, 2018

Omar Sosa and Paolo Fresu: NPR Music Tiny Desk Concert

  

Omar Sosa and Paolo Fresu: NPR Music Tiny Desk Concert


You don't really listen to an Omar Sosa concert so much as experience
it. The Cuban-born pianist's overall demeanor exudes a sense of calm and
deep reflection, while a spiritual connection to music and his
ancestors comes through in his piano playing.

You can hear Sosa draw on more than 100 years of Cuban piano in the
recognizable rhythms of his country's music. But in Sosa's hands, it's
not all fiery and bombastic; he's most effective when he uses Afro-Cuban
tradition as a guide to his distinct, subtle and nuanced approach.

In Paolo Fresu, Sosa has found a sympathetic musical partner. Fresu's
work on trumpet and flugelhorn provides a perfect foil for Sosa's
introspective intersection of jazz, Afro-Cuban sounds and a
chamber-music mentality.

Sosa and Fresu's quietly energetic performance behind Bob Boilen's desk
enveloped everyone in attendance like a soft mist. Fresu's use of
digital delay never clashed with Sosa' acoustic piano, instead adding
another color to the palette; at times, Fresu uses it to add a layer of
rhythm with either the ring on his finger or a blowing technique into
his horn.

Omar Sosa and Paolo Fresu were as much fun to watch as they were to
hear.
Watch this Tiny Desk Concert and see for yourself. --FELIX
CONTRERAS




Set List "Alma" "S'Inguldu" Credits Producer: Felix Contreras; Editor: Denise DeBelius; Audio Engineer: Kevin Wait; Videographers: Denise DeBelius, Gabriella Garcia-Pardo; photo by Elizabeth Chen/NPR






Saturday, July 28, 2018

Glorius Nature

Conversation opened. 1 read message



Healthy young cougar