Stay Positive

"In the midst of winter I finally learned that there was in me an invincible summer." - Alert Camus

Monday, December 31, 2012

Investment Relkated Quotes

I’ve compiled a list of my favorite investment-related quotes.  They come from a range of sources – including many outside the world of finance.  I hope that they provide wisdom and inspiration for the year ahead.



There are only two kinds of forecasters – those who don’t know and those who don’t know they don’t know. 
John Kenneth Galbraith

A bank is a place where they lend you an umbrella in fair weather and ask for it back when it begins to rain.
Robert Frost

When the tide goes out you can see who has been swimming naked.
Warren Buffett

Be fearful when others are greedy and greedy when others are fearful.
Warren Buffett

Short-term clients look for gurus.  Long-term clients want sages.  There are no gurus.
Harold Evensky

Security is mostly a superstition; it doesn’t exist in nature.
Helen Keller

For all long-term investors, there is only one objective – maximum total real return after taxes.
John Templeton

 “Send your grain across the seas,
and in time, profits will flow back to you.
But divide your investments among many places,
for you do not know what risks might lie ahead.
When clouds are heavy, the rains come down…
…Farmers who wait for perfect weather never plant.
If they watch every cloud, they never harvest…
…Plant your seed in the morning and keep busy all afternoon, for you don’t know if profit will come from one activity or another – or maybe both…”
King Solomon


The beginning is the most important part of the work.
Plato 

A big part of financial freedom is having your heart and mind free from worry about the what-ifs of life.
Suze Orman

He who wishes to be rich in a day will be hanged in a year.
Leonardo da Vinci

Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler. 
Albert Einstein

Compound interest is the most powerful force on earth.
Albert Einstein

It’s not that I am smarter; I just stay with problems longer.
Albert Einstein

He that cannot abide a bad market, deserves not a good one.
John Ray 

The evidence on investment managers’ success with market timing is impressive – and overwhelmingly negative.
Charles D. Ellis 

Money is of a prolific generating nature.  Money can beget money, and its offspring can beget more.
Benjamin Franklin


Time is Archimedes’ lever in investing.
Charles D. Ellis 

Change is the investor’s only certainty.
T. Rowe Price, Jr.

The nightingale which cannot bear the thorn – it is best that it should never speak of the rose.
Anwar-i-Suhaili

Risk drives returns.
Charles Ellis

You have to pick what you’re going to be worried about.  Markets are volatile, but retirement is certain.
Nick Murray

Not to decide is to decide.
Gary Helms

Pay tax on what you take not what you make.  If you can eliminate the government as 39.6% partner, then you will be much better off.
Warren Buffett

Any security specific selection decision is preceded either implicitly or explicitly by an asset allocation decision.
Scott Lummer and Mark Riepe

The most treasured asset in investment management is a steady hand at the tiller.
Robert Arnott

The art of taxation consists in so plucking the goose as to get the most feathers with the least hissing.
Jean Batiste Colbert

What the wise man does in the beginning, the fool does in the end.
Unknown

Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to reform. "It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble.  It's what you know for certain that just ain't true."  Thinking that you know the future.
Mark Twain

Never forget the six-foot tall man who drowned crossing the river that was five feet deep on average.  The important thing to remember about investing is that it is not sufficient to set up a portfolio that will survive on average.  The key is to survive at the low ends.
Howard Marks

"Risk means more things can happen than will happen.”  It is not standard deviation.  It is not variability.  It is this sense that the future events are highly variable and unknowable that gives us the best sense for risk.
Elroy Dimson

Smart investing doesn't consist of buying good assets, but of buying assets well.  This is a very, very important distinction that very, very few people understand.
Howard Marks 

As weather is to climate, so is the short term to the long term, if we think of forming an outlook or forecast.
Howard Marks

Markets act on new information which by definition nobody has.
Unknown

I have enough money to last me the rest of my life, unless I buy something.
Jackie Mason








Source:
The Best Investment-Related Quotes 

http://advisorperspectives.com/newsletters12/53-bestquotes.php






New Year's Resolutions

 



Practice what you preach...

Meditation

Mindfulness

Dean Ornish diet principles for Heart Health 

Exercise

Live well with multiple sclerosis, chronic pain and age








Mindfully Making New Years Resolution



 New Year Eve Celebration



Generally speaking, these aspirational changes are quite helpful and healthy. They guide us to make substantive, meaningful change in our lives. 

We might decide to get in shape in order to feel better and (hopefully) be able to live longer to spend more time with our family. We might decide to get a new job in order to feel more satisfied at work.

Whatever the desired change and motivation, New Year's resolutions provide an opportunity to recognize important personal values and articulate related goals for fulfillment.


So, what does mindfulness have to offer?   

 Is an objective awareness of the present moment with its focus on acceptance applicable to the establishment and pursuit of life-changing actions?  Put simply, "no."

 Mindfulness with its emphasis on experiencing the present as it exists is not too keen on changing it. 

Unless one of your resolutions is to practice mindfulness or acceptance more regularly in 2010, then the emphasis on being present in the now won't help you realize your goals. 
Think about it: is mindfulness going to get you to go to the gym or line-up a series of job interviews?   Of course not. 

 However, some of the essential qualities of mindfulness can be helpful for you.

In his seminal book, Full Catastrophe Living, 
Dr. Jon Kabat-Zinn outlined what he described as -

the "attitudinal foundations of mindfulness."
Non-judging

Patience


Beginner's Mind


Trust


Non-striving


Acceptance 


Letting Go







In addition, I would add "Non-identification" as another aspect of mindfulness.  

Taken together and applied sensitively to your resolutions, these qualities will help you approach your desired changes in ways that are sensitive, respectful, and supportive of change.



 

Non-judging

This perspective involves suspending our tendency to evaluate experiences.

However, if you've made a resolution for 2013, then it's too late: you've already made a judgment in deciding on something to change. Fortunately, we can adopt a non-judging approach to our resolutions subsequently. We can stop second-guessing our resolutions as good, bad, or "not enough," for example.


Patience

This one is probably obvious. Change typically doesn't happen overnight, and we need to be patient as we try to bring about something new in our lives. Intellectually, we understand this fact, but it's harder to appreciate through actual experience.


Beginner's Mind

This principle refers to the ability to experience the present moment as if it were existing for the very first time, which-of course-it is. You haven't been in this precise time and space until now. For the New Year, it means that these resolutions of ours are brand new. Even if they're something that we've made in the past, we've never had the opportunity to make them in 2013. Thus, we need to approach these resolutions with an attitude of freshness and curiosity. Whatever happened previously is over. All we have is our resolutions manifest in the here-and-now.


Trust

Trust refers to the ability to have faith in our intuitive wisdom as well as the present moment. For our resolutions, it means cultivating the ability to recognize that we'll know how to best approach them. Even if we don't know how to accomplish something, we can be confident in knowing when we don't know, and perhaps seeking some advice or guidance.


Non-striving

This one might seem a bit antithetical to having New Year's resolutions. Aren't they all about striving for something? Sure. However, we can embody our desire for change through gentle persistence as opposed to brute force. There's no need to push hard for realization of our resolutions when a simple nudge or light pressure will suffice.


Acceptance

Just as the present moment needs to be accepted as it exists, so does our relationship to whatever change we're trying to make. We are here, regardless of where we want to be. Telling ourselves that we need or should be someplace else (physically, emotionally, occupationally, etc.) provides little motivation. More often than not, we feel miserable and discouraged as we work towards change. For example, if you've lost one pound, you've lost one pound. This is true regardless of the fact that you want to lose 20 pounds or that it's Week #8 of your new diet and exercise regimen.


Letting Go

We need to abandon our desire for things to be different than how they are? Obviously, this is not relevant to resolutions in which we're actively trying to be different. However, sometimes we hold on to fantasies about our past or future, which make it more difficult to engage the present. For example, reminiscing about how athletic you were in high school is not likely to help you much in getting in shape now. So, we often need to let go of these remembrances and desires in order to better address what's happening for us now.


Non-identification

Mindfulness encourages us to recognize the present moment without becoming too wrapped-up in it personally.  Similarly, our self-worth is not dependent on whether or not we succeed or fail in realizing our New Year's Resolutions. If you abandon or forget your resolution, it's okay. You are not a better or worse person. And, if it truly troubles you, you can always try again in the next moment or even wait until next year.


Finally, it's important to recognize that your realization of your New Year's resolutions likely will not happen in an instant.

It's not as if you suddenly will lose 20 pounds or instantly land a job. Rather, it will take a series of successive moments as you work towards the change that you seek. Hmm...successive present moments? What can we do with those?










 Source:
The Mindful Gorilla

 http://themindfulgorilla.blogspot.ca/




Friday, December 28, 2012

What is CBD? - YouTube




 Uploaded on Dec 7, 2011



 
http://www.weedmaps.com Take a closer look at the benefits of Cannabidiol (CBD) and how it is synthesized in the cannabis plant.



Source:
What is CBD? - YouTube

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=31SrjjgPbhU#!



Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy



DAVE McGINN
The Globe and Mail




Zindel Segal was in a Toronto bookstore a few weeks ago, when a title caught his eye. The book, The Mindful Investor, caused him a moment of shock and panic.

"I turned to someone and said, 'This is the beginning of the end,' " recalls Dr. Segal, who heads the cognitive behaviour therapy clinic at Toronto's Centre for Addiction and Mental Health.

 
The book, which purports to explain how a calm mind can help a person achieve financial security, is a sign that the concept of mindfulness is making a leap into mass popularity. But that doesn't mean people actually understand it, he says.

Mindfulness is a technique for slowing down and examining one's thought processes, and learning to be in the moment. 

Based on Buddhist principles, it became popular in the United States in the 1970s, and was taken up by celebs such as Meg Ryan and Goldie Hawn. Today, researchers are studying its benefits for everything from depression to stress.

In a multi-year study, whose results were published last month in the Archives of General Psychiatry, Dr. Segal and a group of colleagues found that mindfulness meditation - the term they use is "mindfulness-based cognitive therapy" - was just as effective as antidepressants when it came to preventing depression relapse.

Dr. Segal, who was one of the developers of the therapy, teaches it at CAMH in group treatment sessions with patients who have recovered from depression and are "trying to stay well."

"We're seeing a demand as people feel that it's more and more legitimate," Dr. Segal says.

He defines mindfulness meditation as "a way of training yourself to pay attention in the present moment without judgment [as]to what your experience is."
Thanks to a similar U.K. study, which found the technique reduces the risk of depression relapse by 50 per cent, Britain's National Institute for Clinical Excellence recommends mindfulness meditation in cases of chronic depression. The Mental Health Foundation, a U.K.-based charity, has recently launched a campaign called Be Mindful, and offers an online program intended to make mindfulness more widely available.

"It's growing exponentially almost, in terms of there now being an evidence base," says Ed Halliwell, a British mindfulness teacher and co-author of:

"The Mindfulness Manifesto: How Doing Less and Noticing More Can help Us Thrive in a Stressed-out World". 

While the field is still relatively new, some 300 to 400 studies are published each year, Mr. Halliwell estimates.

The studies show benefits for many conditions, including anxiety and stress. A study published last year in the journal Neurology found that mindfulness could be used to help people with multiple sclerosis.


And just as it is becoming more popular among researchers, it is also increasingly being sought out by busy professionals.


"Life these days is these days so full of stress … so I think this offers some way of simplifying our life," says Marian Smith, founder of Mindful Living, a Vancouver-based clinic. Many clients, says Ms. Smith, are dealing with "the challenge of juggling full-time work, having a family, trying to make life meaningful to themselves and to be grounded."

Doug MacLean, a mindfulness meditation instructor and owner of Practical Wellbeing in Calgary, says there has been an "explosion" in interest, in large part because of the research being published on the topic.

But some experts worry that some people may think all they need to do to solve their problems is close their eyes and pay attention to what's going on in their heads.
"That can be a real danger, because people can go, 'All I need to do is be mindful.' And then perhaps they try meditation and discover it's not easy - it's simple, but it's not easy - and then that can create another level of beating yourself up," Mr. Halliwell says.

Dr. Segal says that people need to understand that mindfulness is much different than the popular idea of meditation.


"You think of the Beatles, you think of TM [transcendental meditation] you think of people achieving some kind of bliss state. And it's really different from what people who are going through mindfulness-based cognitive therapy get," he says. "If anything, what the meditation does is provide them with a way of staying grounded in the midst of very difficult emotions."






Stressed out? Try mindfulness meditation - The Globe and Mail



http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/stressed-out-try-mindfulness-meditation/article561130/






Stressed out? Try mindfulness meditation



DAVE McGINN
The Globe and Mail




Zindel Segal was in a Toronto bookstore a few weeks ago, when a title caught his eye. The book, The Mindful Investor, caused him a moment of shock and panic.

"I turned to someone and said, 'This is the beginning of the end,' " recalls Dr. Segal, who heads the cognitive behaviour therapy clinic at Toronto's Centre for Addiction and Mental Health.

 
The book, which purports to explain how a calm mind can help a person achieve financial security, is a sign that the concept of mindfulness is making a leap into mass popularity. But that doesn't mean people actually understand it, he says.

Mindfulness is a technique for slowing down and examining one's thought processes, and learning to be in the moment. 

Based on Buddhist principles, it became popular in the United States in the 1970s, and was taken up by celebs such as Meg Ryan and Goldie Hawn. Today, researchers are studying its benefits for everything from depression to stress.

In a multi-year study, whose results were published last month in the Archives of General Psychiatry, Dr. Segal and a group of colleagues found that mindfulness meditation - the term they use is "mindfulness-based cognitive therapy" - was just as effective as antidepressants when it came to preventing depression relapse.

Dr. Segal, who was one of the developers of the therapy, teaches it at CAMH in group treatment sessions with patients who have recovered from depression and are "trying to stay well."

"We're seeing a demand as people feel that it's more and more legitimate," Dr. Segal says.

He defines mindfulness meditation as "a way of training yourself to pay attention in the present moment without judgment [as]to what your experience is."
Thanks to a similar U.K. study, which found the technique reduces the risk of depression relapse by 50 per cent, Britain's National Institute for Clinical Excellence recommends mindfulness meditation in cases of chronic depression. The Mental Health Foundation, a U.K.-based charity, has recently launched a campaign called Be Mindful, and offers an online program intended to make mindfulness more widely available.

"It's growing exponentially almost, in terms of there now being an evidence base," says Ed Halliwell, a British mindfulness teacher and co-author of:

"The Mindfulness Manifesto: How Doing Less and Noticing More Can help Us Thrive in a Stressed-out World". 

While the field is still relatively new, some 300 to 400 studies are published each year, Mr. Halliwell estimates.

The studies show benefits for many conditions, including anxiety and stress. A study published last year in the journal Neurology found that mindfulness could be used to help people with multiple sclerosis.


And just as it is becoming more popular among researchers, it is also increasingly being sought out by busy professionals.


"Life these days is these days so full of stress … so I think this offers some way of simplifying our life," says Marian Smith, founder of Mindful Living, a Vancouver-based clinic. Many clients, says Ms. Smith, are dealing with "the challenge of juggling full-time work, having a family, trying to make life meaningful to themselves and to be grounded."

Doug MacLean, a mindfulness meditation instructor and owner of Practical Wellbeing in Calgary, says there has been an "explosion" in interest, in large part because of the research being published on the topic.

But some experts worry that some people may think all they need to do to solve their problems is close their eyes and pay attention to what's going on in their heads.
"That can be a real danger, because people can go, 'All I need to do is be mindful.' And then perhaps they try meditation and discover it's not easy - it's simple, but it's not easy - and then that can create another level of beating yourself up," Mr. Halliwell says.

Dr. Segal says that people need to understand that mindfulness is much different than the popular idea of meditation.


"You think of the Beatles, you think of TM [transcendental meditation] you think of people achieving some kind of bliss state. And it's really different from what people who are going through mindfulness-based cognitive therapy get," he says. "If anything, what the meditation does is provide them with a way of staying grounded in the midst of very difficult emotions."






Stressed out? Try mindfulness meditation - The Globe and Mail



http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/stressed-out-try-mindfulness-meditation/article561130/






Illustrated Flowcharts to Find Life's Big Answers

 







From ever-inventive designer Stefan G. Bucher of You Deserve a Medal and Daily Monster fame comes 344 Questions: The Creative Person’s Do-It-Yourself Guide to Insight, Survival, and Artistic Fulfillment — a delightful pocket-sized compendium of flowcharts and lists illustrated in Bucher’s unmistakable style to help you figure out life’s big answers, in the vein of today’s inadvertent running theme of self-help-books-that-aren’t-really-”self-help”-books.
Besides Bucher’s own questions, the tiny but potent handbook features contributions from 36 beloved cross-disciplinary creators, including Brain Pickings favorites Christoph Niemann, Stefan Sagmeister, Marian Bantjes, Doyald Young, and Jakob Trollbäck.


 Read More:
344 Illustrated Flowcharts to Find Life's Big Answers | Brain Pickings

Link:  http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2011/09/09/stefan-bucher-344-questions/





Monday, December 24, 2012

Study examines fingolimod therapy



Study examines fingolimod therapy in patients with multiple sclerosis

July 2nd, 2012 in Neuroscience

The medication fingolimod reduced inflammatory lesion activity and reduced brain volume loss in patients with multiple sclerosis who participated in a two-year placebo-controlled clinical trial and were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures, according to a report published Online First by Archives of Neurology.

Fingolimod is the first in a new class of drugs called the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor (S1PR) modulators that was recently approved at 0.5 mg once daily for the treatment of relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS), a debilitating disease of the , according to the study background.

The inflammatory pathology of MS can be seen by counting gadolinium (Gd)-enhancing lesions on T1-weighted images or new and enlarging T2 lesions on serial . The extent of hyperintense areas on T2-weighted images provides an indication of the overall burden of disease, the study background explains.

The study by Ernst-Wilhelm Radue, M.D., of the Medical Image Analysis Center, University Hospital, Basel, Switzerland, and colleagues included 1,272 patients who were part of the fingolimod FTY720 Research Evaluating Effects of Daily Oral Therapy in Multiple Sclerosis (FREEDOMS) clinical trial, a worldwide, multicenter effort. Patients received once-daily fingolimod capsules of 0.5 mg or 1.25 mg, or placebo.

"The anti-inflammatory effects of fingolimod therapy, as depicted by Gd-enhancing lesions and new/newly enlarged T2 lesions, were evident as early as 6 months after treatment initiation and were sustained over two years. Approximately half the patients receiving fingolimod therapy were free from any new inflammatory lesions throughout this 2-year study, compared with only 21 percent of patients receiving placebo," the authors comment.

Fingolimod, 0.5 mg (licensed dose), "significantly reduced" loss during the trial versus placebo, according to the study results. is recognized as a useful way to monitor MS disease progression.

"These results, coupled with the significant reductions in relapse rates and disability progression reported previously, support the positive impact on long-term disease evolution," the study concludes.

More information: Arch Neurol. Published online July 2, 2012.

doi:10.1001/archneurol.2012.1051
Provided by JAMA and Archives Journals
"Study examines fingolimod therapy in patients with multiple sclerosis." July 2nd, 2012. 


Source:
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-07-fingolimod-therapy-patients-multiple-sclerosis.html

Journal reference: Archives of Neurology search and more info website Provided by JAMA and Archives Journals search and more info website

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-07-fingolimod-therapy-patients-multiple-sclerosis.html#jCp

Study examines fingolimod therapy in patients with multiple sclerosis





Journal reference: Archives of Neurology search and more info website Provided by JAMA and Archives Journals search and more info website

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-07-fingolimod-therapy-patients-multiple-sclerosis.html#jCp

Eye scan could help track progress of multiple sclerosis

 
Eye scan could help track progress of multiple sclerosis

 

 

 

 

 

                                             

 

 

Eye scan could help track progress of multiple sclerosis

December 24th, 2012 in Neuroscience

Study found that faster thinning of retina was tied to more lesions.
(HealthDay)—In-office eye scans that assess the thinning of the retina may also help doctors determine how fast multiple sclerosis (MS) is progressing in patients with the nervous system disease, a new study suggests.
The study included 164 who underwent eye scans every six months for an average of 21 months. The participants also had MRI brain scans at the start of the study and yearly.

Patients with MS relapses had 42 percent faster retinal thinning than those with no relapses, the study found. Patients with inflammatory lesions called gadolinium-enhancing lesions had 54 percent faster retinal thinning, and those with new T2 lesions had 36 percent faster thinning, compared to patients who did not have evidence of such lesions on their MRI brain scans, the investigators found.

In addition, patients whose disability levels worsened during the study period had 37 percent more retinal thinning than those who had no changes in their disability levels.

And compared with patients who had the disease for more than five years, those who had MS for less than five years had 43 percent faster retinal thinning, the study authors noted.

The findings suggest that retinal thinning may occur faster in patients with earlier and more active MS.

The new report appears in the Jan. 1 online edition of the journal Neurology. It updates earlier results from this study, published in the in October.

"As more therapies are developed to slow the progression of MS, testing retinal thinning in the eyes may be helpful in evaluating how effective those therapies are," study author Dr. Peter Calabresi, of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said in a journal news release.

Other experts not connected to the study agreed.

"This study reports an important link between the inflammatory and neurodegenerative aspects of MS that should lead to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of tissue damage," said Dr. Fred Lublin, director of the Corinne Goldsmith Dickinson Center for at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City.

He added that, "The techniques described may add to our ability to better perform studies of neuroprotective agents in MS."

And Dr. Floyd Warren, chief of neuro-ophthalmology at Lenox Hill Hospital, in New York City, called the study "very intriguing."

He stressed, however, that the study was preliminary and "looked primarily at relapsing remitting MS; the progressive forms and clinically isolated syndrome patients were much fewer in number."

Warren agreed with the other experts that these retinal scans might be used to track the effectiveness of new MS drugs, especially since such tests are "totally benign" and have "relatively low cost."

"Further studies with larger numbers of progressive will need to be done to see if it proves as (potentially) a reliable marker in these patients," he said.








More information: The U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has more about multiple sclerosis.

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.






"Eye scan could help track progress of multiple sclerosis." December 24th, 2012.

 http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-12-eye-scan-track-multiple-sclerosis.html
The study included 164 MS patients who underwent eye scans every six months for an average of 21 months. The participants also had MRI brain scans at the start of the study and yearly. Patients with MS relapses had 42 percent faster retinal thinning than those with no relapses, the study found. Patients with inflammatory lesions called gadolinium-enhancing lesions had 54 percent faster retinal thinning, and those with new T2 lesions had 36 percent faster thinning, compared to patients who did not have evidence of such lesions on their MRI brain scans, the investigators found. In addition, patients whose disability levels worsened during the study period had 37 percent more retinal thinning than those who had no changes in their disability levels. And compared with patients who had the disease for more than five years, those who had MS for less than five years had 43 percent faster retinal thinning, the study authors noted. The findings suggest that retinal thinning may occur faster in patients with earlier and more active MS. The new report appears in the Jan. 1 online edition of the journal Neurology. It updates earlier results from this study, published in the Archives of Neurology in October. "As more therapies are developed to slow the progression of MS, testing retinal thinning in the eyes may be helpful in evaluating how effective those therapies are," study author Dr. Peter Calabresi, of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said in a journal news release. Other experts not connected to the study agreed. "This study reports an important link between the inflammatory and neurodegenerative aspects of MS that should lead to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of tissue damage," said Dr. Fred Lublin, director of the Corinne Goldsmith Dickinson Center for Multiple Sclerosis at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City. He added that, "The techniques described may add to our ability to better perform studies of neuroprotective agents in MS." And Dr. Floyd Warren, chief of neuro-ophthalmology at Lenox Hill Hospital, in New York City, called the study "very intriguing." He stressed, however, that the study was preliminary and "looked primarily at relapsing remitting MS; the progressive forms and clinically isolated syndrome patients were much fewer in number." Warren agreed with the other experts that these retinal scans might be used to track the effectiveness of new MS drugs, especially since such tests are "totally benign" and have "relatively low cost." "Further studies with larger numbers of progressive MS patients will need to be done to see if it proves as (potentially) a reliable marker in these patients," he said. More information: The U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has more about multiple sclerosis. Journal reference: Neurology search and more info website Archives of Neurology search and more info website Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved. Ads by Google print this article email this article 0 text-to-speech save as pdf send feedback share to facebook share to twitter share send feedback to editors not rated yet 1 2 3 4 5

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-12-eye-scan-track-multiple-sclerosis.html#jCp
tudy found that faster thinning of retina was tied to more lesions. (HealthDay)—In-office eye scans that assess the thinning of the retina may also help doctors determine how fast multiple sclerosis (MS) is progressing in patients with the nervous system disease, a new study suggests. Ads by Google Private Pay Cdn. Surgery - Receive fast access surgery in private Canadian Surgical Centres - www.timelymedical.ca I Had High Blood Pressure - Now it's down to 120/75. Find out how I did it without drugs - Costco.ca The study included 164 MS patients who underwent eye scans every six months for an average of 21 months. The participants also had MRI brain scans at the start of the study and yearly. Patients with MS relapses had 42 percent faster retinal thinning than those with no relapses, the study found. Patients with inflammatory lesions called gadolinium-enhancing lesions had 54 percent faster retinal thinning, and those with new T2 lesions had 36 percent faster thinning, compared to patients who did not have evidence of such lesions on their MRI brain scans, the investigators found. In addition, patients whose disability levels worsened during the study period had 37 percent more retinal thinning than those who had no changes in their disability levels. And compared with patients who had the disease for more than five years, those who had MS for less than five years had 43 percent faster retinal thinning, the study authors noted. The findings suggest that retinal thinning may occur faster in patients with earlier and more active MS. The new report appears in the Jan. 1 online edition of the journal Neurology. It updates earlier results from this study, published in the Archives of Neurology in October. "As more therapies are developed to slow the progression of MS, testing retinal thinning in the eyes may be helpful in evaluating how effective those therapies are," study author Dr. Peter Calabresi, of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said in a journal news release. Other experts not connected to the study agreed. "This study reports an important link between the inflammatory and neurodegenerative aspects of MS that should lead to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of tissue damage," said Dr. Fred Lublin, director of the Corinne Goldsmith Dickinson Center for Multiple Sclerosis at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City. He added that, "The techniques described may add to our ability to better perform studies of neuroprotective agents in MS." And Dr. Floyd Warren, chief of neuro-ophthalmology at Lenox Hill Hospital, in New York City, called the study "very intriguing." He stressed, however, that the study was preliminary and "looked primarily at relapsing remitting MS; the progressive forms and clinically isolated syndrome patients were much fewer in number." Warren agreed with the other experts that these retinal scans might be used to track the effectiveness of new MS drugs, especially since such tests are "totally benign" and have "relatively low cost." "Further studies with larger numbers of progressive MS patients will need to be done to see if it proves as (potentially) a reliable marker in these patients," he said. More information: The U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has more about multiple sclerosis. Journal reference: Neurology search and more info website Archives of Neurology search and more info website Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-12-eye-scan-track-multiple-sclerosis.html#jCp

Source:
Eye scan could help track progress of multiple sclerosis Study found that faster thinning of retina was tied to more lesions. (HealthDay)—In-office eye scans that assess the thinning of the retina may also help doctors determine how fast multiple sclerosis (MS) is progressing in patients with the nervous system disease, a new study suggests. Ads by Google Private Pay Cdn. Surgery - Receive fast access surgery in private Canadian Surgical Centres - www.timelymedical.ca I Had High Blood Pressure - Now it's down to 120/75. Find out how I did it without drugs - Costco.ca The study included 164 MS patients who underwent eye scans every six months for an average of 21 months. The participants also had MRI brain scans at the start of the study and yearly. Patients with MS relapses had 42 percent faster retinal thinning than those with no relapses, the study found. Patients with inflammatory lesions called gadolinium-enhancing lesions had 54 percent faster retinal thinning, and those with new T2 lesions had 36 percent faster thinning, compared to patients who did not have evidence of such lesions on their MRI brain scans, the investigators found. In addition, patients whose disability levels worsened during the study period had 37 percent more retinal thinning than those who had no changes in their disability levels. And compared with patients who had the disease for more than five years, those who had MS for less than five years had 43 percent faster retinal thinning, the study authors noted. The findings suggest that retinal thinning may occur faster in patients with earlier and more active MS. The new report appears in the Jan. 1 online edition of the journal Neurology. It updates earlier results from this study, published in the Archives of Neurology in October. "As more therapies are developed to slow the progression of MS, testing retinal thinning in the eyes may be helpful in evaluating how effective those therapies are," study author Dr. Peter Calabresi, of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said in a journal news release. Other experts not connected to the study agreed. "This study reports an important link between the inflammatory and neurodegenerative aspects of MS that should lead to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of tissue damage," said Dr. Fred Lublin, director of the Corinne Goldsmith Dickinson Center for Multiple Sclerosis at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City. He added that, "The techniques described may add to our ability to better perform studies of neuroprotective agents in MS." And Dr. Floyd Warren, chief of neuro-ophthalmology at Lenox Hill Hospital, in New York City, called the study "very intriguing." He stressed, however, that the study was preliminary and "looked primarily at relapsing remitting MS; the progressive forms and clinically isolated syndrome patients were much fewer in number." Warren agreed with the other experts that these retinal scans might be used to track the effectiveness of new MS drugs, especially since such tests are "totally benign" and have "relatively low cost." "Further studies with larger numbers of progressive MS patients will need to be done to see if it proves as (potentially) a reliable marker in these patients," he said. More information: The U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has more about multiple sclerosis.

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Eye scan could help track progress of multiple sclerosis

December 24th, 2012 in Neuroscience
Eye scan could help track progress of multiple sclerosis
Study found that faster thinning of retina was tied to more lesions.
(HealthDay)—In-office eye scans that assess the thinning of the retina may also help doctors determine how fast multiple sclerosis (MS) is progressing in patients with the nervous system disease, a new study suggests.
The study included 164 who underwent eye scans every six months for an average of 21 months. The participants also had MRI brain scans at the start of the study and yearly.
Patients with MS relapses had 42 percent faster retinal thinning than those with no relapses, the study found. Patients with inflammatory lesions called gadolinium-enhancing lesions had 54 percent faster retinal thinning, and those with new T2 lesions had 36 percent faster thinning, compared to patients who did not have evidence of such lesions on their MRI brain scans, the investigators found.
In addition, patients whose disability levels worsened during the study period had 37 percent more retinal thinning than those who had no changes in their disability levels.
And compared with patients who had the disease for more than five years, those who had MS for less than five years had 43 percent faster retinal thinning, the study authors noted.
The findings suggest that retinal thinning may occur faster in patients with earlier and more active MS.
The new report appears in the Jan. 1 online edition of the journal Neurology. It updates earlier results from this study, published in the in October.
"As more therapies are developed to slow the progression of MS, testing retinal thinning in the eyes may be helpful in evaluating how effective those therapies are," study author Dr. Peter Calabresi, of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said in a journal news release.
Other experts not connected to the study agreed.
"This study reports an important link between the inflammatory and neurodegenerative aspects of MS that should lead to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of tissue damage," said Dr. Fred Lublin, director of the Corinne Goldsmith Dickinson Center for at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City. He added that, "The techniques described may add to our ability to better perform studies of neuroprotective agents in MS."
And Dr. Floyd Warren, chief of neuro-ophthalmology at Lenox Hill Hospital, in New York City, called the study "very intriguing."
He stressed, however, that the study was preliminary and "looked primarily at relapsing remitting MS; the progressive forms and clinically isolated syndrome patients were much fewer in number."
Warren agreed with the other experts that these retinal scans might be used to track the effectiveness of new MS drugs, especially since such tests are "totally benign" and have "relatively low cost."
"Further studies with larger numbers of progressive will need to be done to see if it proves as (potentially) a reliable marker in these patients," he said.
More information: The U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has more about multiple sclerosis.
Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
"Eye scan could help track progress of multiple sclerosis." December 24th, 2012. http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-12-eye-scan-track-multiple-sclerosis.html
(HealthDay)—In-office eye scans that assess the thinning of the retina may also help doctors determine how fast multiple sclerosis (MS) is progressing in patients with the nervous system disease, a new study suggests. Ads by Google Private Pay Cdn. Surgery - Receive fast access surgery in private Canadian Surgical Centres - www.timelymedical.ca I Had High Blood Pressure - Now it's down to 120/75. Find out how I did it without drugs - Costco.ca The study included 164 MS patients who underwent eye scans every six months for an average of 21 months. The participants also had MRI brain scans at the start of the study and yearly. Patients with MS relapses had 42 percent faster retinal thinning than those with no relapses, the study found. Patients with inflammatory lesions called gadolinium-enhancing lesions had 54 percent faster retinal thinning, and those with new T2 lesions had 36 percent faster thinning, compared to patients who did not have evidence of such lesions on their MRI brain scans, the investigators found. In addition, patients whose disability levels worsened during the study period had 37 percent more retinal thinning than those who had no changes in their disability levels. And compared with patients who had the disease for more than five years, those who had MS for less than five years had 43 percent faster retinal thinning, the study authors noted. The findings suggest that retinal thinning may occur faster in patients with earlier and more active MS. The new report appears in the Jan. 1 online edition of the journal Neurology. It updates earlier results from this study, published in the Archives of Neurology in October. "As more therapies are developed to slow the progression of MS, testing retinal thinning in the eyes may be helpful in evaluating how effective those therapies are," study author Dr. Peter Calabresi, of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said in a journal news release. Other experts not connected to the study agreed. "This study reports an important link between the inflammatory and neurodegenerative aspects of MS that should lead to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of tissue damage," said Dr. Fred Lublin, director of the Corinne Goldsmith Dickinson Center for Multiple Sclerosis at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City. He added that, "The techniques described may add to our ability to better perform studies of neuroprotective agents in MS." And Dr. Floyd Warren, chief of neuro-ophthalmology at Lenox Hill Hospital, in New York City, called the study "very intriguing." He stressed, however, that the study was preliminary and "looked primarily at relapsing remitting MS; the progressive forms and clinically isolated syndrome patients were much fewer in number." Warren agreed with the other experts that these retinal scans might be used to track the effectiveness of new MS drugs, especially since such tests are "totally benign" and have "relatively low cost." "Further studies with larger numbers of progressive MS patients will need to be done to see if it proves as (potentially) a reliable marker in these patients," he s

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-12-eye-scan-track-multiple-sclerosis.html#jCp
(HealthDay)—In-office eye scans that assess the thinning of the retina may also help doctors determine how fast multiple sclerosis (MS) is progressing in patients with the nervous system disease, a new study suggests. Ads by Google Private Pay Cdn. Surgery - Receive fast access surgery in private Canadian Surgical Centres - www.timelymedical.ca I Had High Blood Pressure - Now it's down to 120/75. Find out how I did it without drugs - Costco.ca The study included 164 MS patients who underwent eye scans every six months for an average of 21 months. The participants also had MRI brain scans at the start of the study and yearly. Patients with MS relapses had 42 percent faster retinal thinning than those with no relapses, the study found. Patients with inflammatory lesions called gadolinium-enhancing lesions had 54 percent faster retinal thinning, and those with new T2 lesions had 36 percent faster thinning, compared to patients who did not have evidence of such lesions on their MRI brain scans, the investigators found. In addition, patients whose disability levels worsened during the study period had 37 percent more retinal thinning than those who had no changes in their disability levels. And compared with patients who had the disease for more than five years, those who had MS for less than five years had 43 percent faster retinal thinning, the study authors noted. The findings suggest that retinal thinning may occur faster in patients with earlier and more active MS. The new report appears in the Jan. 1 online edition of the journal Neurology. It updates earlier results from this study, published in the Archives of Neurology in October. "As more therapies are developed to slow the progression of MS, testing retinal thinning in the eyes may be helpful in evaluating how effective those therapies are," study author Dr. Peter Calabresi, of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said in a journal news release. Other experts not connected to the study agreed. "This study reports an important link between the inflammatory and neurodegenerative aspects of MS that should lead to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of tissue damage," said Dr. Fred Lublin, director of the Corinne Goldsmith Dickinson Center for Multiple Sclerosis at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City. He added that, "The techniques described may add to our ability to better perform studies of neuroprotective agents in MS." And Dr. Floyd Warren, chief of neuro-ophthalmology at Lenox Hill Hospital, in New York City, called the study "very intriguing." He stressed, however, that the study was preliminary and "looked primarily at relapsing remitting MS; the progressive forms and clinically isolated syndrome patients were much fewer in number." Warren agreed with the other experts that these retinal scans might be used to track the effectiveness of new MS drugs, especially since such tests are "totally benign" and have "relatively low cost." "Further studies with larger numbers of progressive MS patients will need to be done to see if it proves as (potentially) a reliable marker in these patients," he s

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-12-eye-scan-track-multiple-sclerosis.html#jCp
(HealthDay)—In-office eye scans that assess the thinning of the retina may also help doctors determine how fast multiple sclerosis (MS) is progressing in patients with the nervous system disease, a new study suggests. Ads by Google Private Pay Cdn. Surgery - Receive fast access surgery in private Canadian Surgical Centres - www.timelymedical.ca I Had High Blood Pressure - Now it's down to 120/75. Find out how I did it without drugs - Costco.ca The study included 164 MS patients who underwent eye scans every six months for an average of 21 months. The participants also had MRI brain scans at the start of the study and yearly. Patients with MS relapses had 42 percent faster retinal thinning than those with no relapses, the study found. Patients with inflammatory lesions called gadolinium-enhancing lesions had 54 percent faster retinal thinning, and those with new T2 lesions had 36 percent faster thinning, compared to patients who did not have evidence of such lesions on their MRI brain scans, the investigators found. In addition, patients whose disability levels worsened during the study period had 37 percent more retinal thinning than those who had no changes in their disability levels. And compared with patients who had the disease for more than five years, those who had MS for less than five years had 43 percent faster retinal thinning, the study authors noted. The findings suggest that retinal thinning may occur faster in patients with earlier and more active MS. The new report appears in the Jan. 1 online edition of the journal Neurology. It updates earlier results from this study, published in the Archives of Neurology in October. "As more therapies are developed to slow the progression of MS, testing retinal thinning in the eyes may be helpful in evaluating how effective those therapies are," study author Dr. Peter Calabresi, of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said in a journal news release. Other experts not connected to the study agreed. "This study reports an important link between the inflammatory and neurodegenerative aspects of MS that should lead to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of tissue damage," said Dr. Fred Lublin, director of the Corinne Goldsmith Dickinson Center for Multiple Sclerosis at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City. He added that, "The techniques described may add to our ability to better perform studies of neuroprotective agents in MS." And Dr. Floyd Warren, chief of neuro-ophthalmology at Lenox Hill Hospital, in New York City, called the study "very intriguing." He stressed, however, that the study was preliminary and "looked primarily at relapsing remitting MS; the progressive forms and clinically isolated syndrome patients were much fewer in number." Warren agreed with the other experts that these retinal scans might be used to track the effectiveness of new MS drugs, especially since such tests are "totally benign" and have "relatively low cost." "Further studies with larger numbers of progressive MS patients will need to be done to see if it proves as (potentially) a reliable marker in these patients," he s

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-12-eye-scan-track-multiple-sclerosis.html#jCp
(HealthDay)—In-office eye scans that assess the thinning of the retina may also help doctors determine how fast multiple sclerosis (MS) is progressing in patients with the nervous system disease, a new study suggests. Ads by Google Private Pay Cdn. Surgery - Receive fast access surgery in private Canadian Surgical Centres - www.timelymedical.ca I Had High Blood Pressure - Now it's down to 120/75. Find out how I did it without drugs - Costco.ca The study included 164 MS patients who underwent eye scans every six months for an average of 21 months. The participants also had MRI brain scans at the start of the study and yearly. Patients with MS relapses had 42 percent faster retinal thinning than those with no relapses, the study found. Patients with inflammatory lesions called gadolinium-enhancing lesions had 54 percent faster retinal thinning, and those with new T2 lesions had 36 percent faster thinning, compared to patients who did not have evidence of such lesions on their MRI brain scans, the investigators found. In addition, patients whose disability levels worsened during the study period had 37 percent more retinal thinning than those who had no changes in their disability levels. And compared with patients who had the disease for more than five years, those who had MS for less than five years had 43 percent faster retinal thinning, the study authors noted. The findings suggest that retinal thinning may occur faster in patients with earlier and more active MS. The new report appears in the Jan. 1 online edition of the journal Neurology. It updates earlier results from this study, published in the Archives of Neurology in October. "As more therapies are developed to slow the progression of MS, testing retinal thinning in the eyes may be helpful in evaluating how effective those therapies are," study author Dr. Peter Calabresi, of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said in a journal news release. Other experts not connected to the study agreed. "This study reports an important link between the inflammatory and neurodegenerative aspects of MS that should lead to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of tissue damage," said Dr. Fred Lublin, director of the Corinne Goldsmith Dickinson Center for Multiple Sclerosis at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City. He added that, "The techniques described may add to our ability to better perform studies of neuroprotective agents in MS." And Dr. Floyd Warren, chief of neuro-ophthalmology at Lenox Hill Hospital, in New York City, called the study "very intriguing." He stressed, however, that the study was preliminary and "looked primarily at relapsing remitting MS; the progressive forms and clinically isolated syndrome patients were much fewer in number." Warren agreed with the other experts that these retinal scans might be used to track the effectiveness of new MS drugs, especially since such tests are "totally benign" and have "relatively low cost." "Further studies with larger numbers of progressive MS patients will need to be done to see if it proves as (potentially) a reliable marker in these patients," he s

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-12-eye-scan-track-multiple-sclerosis.html#jCp
Eye scan could help track progress of multiple sclerosis

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